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Water Smart List

Briggs has created an expanded version of the San Diego County Water Authority's 'Nifty 50' list that encourages homeowners to select plants that will help conserve water usage. Cutting back on water doesn't mean you have to plant only succulents and California natives. These plants were chosen because they are attractive, non-invasive, easy to maintain, long-term performers, scaled for residential landscapes and of course, after established, drought tolerant.

Groundcover
Acacia redolens
(Acacia)
Arctostaphylos
(Spreading Manzanita)
Ceanothus
(Carmel Creeper)
Dymondia
(Silver Carpet)
Lampranthus
(Ice Plant)
Lantana
(Trailing Lantana)
Juniperus pro. 'Nana'
(Prostrate Juniper)
Myoporum parvifolium
(Myoporum)
Rosemary
(Prostrate Rosemary)
Sedum
(Stonecrop)
Thymus
(Thyme)

Perennials
Anigozanthos
(Kangaroo Paws)
Artemesia
(Wormwood)
Galvezia
(Island Bush Snapdragon)
Lavendula
(Lavender)
Limonium
(Statice)
Lobelia laxiflora
(Lobelia)
Mimulus
(Monkey Flower)
Penstemon
(Penstemon)
Salvia
(Sage)
Tagetes
(Mexican Marigold)
Teucrium
(Germander)
Verbena
(Peruvian Verbena)

Grasses
Cordyline
(New Zealand Cabbage Tree)
Dietes
(Butterfly Iris, Fortnight Lily)
Muhlenbergia
(Pink Muhly Grass)
Pennisetum rubrum
(Red Fountain Grass)
Phormium
(New Zealand Flax)

Vines
Bougainvillea
(Bougainvillea)
Gelsemium sempervirens
(Carolina Jessamine)
Mascagnia
(Yellow Orchid Vine)
Tecoma smithii
(Orange Bells)

Shrubs
Acacia longifolia
(Acacia)
Arctostaphylos
(Manzanita)
Buddleja
(Butterfly Bush)
Calliandra californica
(Baja Fairy Duster)
Callistemon
(Dwarf Bottlebrush)
Carpenteria californica
(Bush Anemone)
Ceanothus
(California Lilac)
Cercis occidentalis
(Western Redbud)
Chamelaucium
(Geraldton Wax Flower)
Cistus
(Rockrose)
Cytisus
(Genista)
Dodonea viscosa 'Purpurea'
(Purple Hopseed)
Echium
(Pride of Madera)
Euryops
(Golden Shrub Daisy)
Grevillea
(Grevillea)
Hakea suaveolens
(Sweet Hakea)
Heteromeles
(Toyon)
Leonotis
(Lions Tail)
Leptospermum
(Tea Tree)
Leucadendron
(Leucadendron)
Leucophyllum
(Texas Ranger)
Mahonia
(Oregon Grape)
Myrica californica
(Pacific Wax Myrtle)
Myrtus
(Common Myrtle)
Phlomis fruticosa
(Jerusalem Sage)
Rhamnus californica
(Coffeeberry)
Rhus integrifolia
(Lemonade Berry)
Ribes
(Currant, Gooseberry)
Romneya coulteri
(Matilija Poppy)
Rosmarinus
(Rosemary)
Tecoma capensis
(Cape Honeysuckle)
Vitex
(Chaste Tree)
Westringia fruticosa
(Coast Rosemary)

Succulents
Aeonium sp.
(Aeonium)
Agave sp.
(Agave)
Aloe sp.
(Aloe)
Bulbine
(Bulbine)
Calandrinia
(Rock Purslane)
Dasylirion
(Mexican Grass Tree)
Dracaena draco
(Dragon Tree)
Dudleya
(Live Forever)
Echeveria
(Hens n' Chicks)
Hesperaloe
(Red Yucca)
Yucca
(Yucca)

Palms
Chamaerops humilis
(Mediterranean Fan Palm)
Trachycarpus
(Windmill Palm)

Trees
Acacia species
(Acacia)
Agonis flexuosa
(Peppermint Willow)
Arbutus 'Marina'
(Strawberry Tree)
Butia capitata
(Pindo Palm)
Cercidium
(Palo Verde Tree)
Chitalpa
(Chitalpa)
Cordia
(Texas Olive)
Geijera parvifolia
(Australian Willow)
Grevillea robusta
(Silk Oak)
Lagerstroemia indica
(Crape Myrtle)
Lagunaria patersonii
(Primrose Tree)
Laurus nobilis
(Sweet Bay)
Lyonothamnus floribundus
(Catalina Ironwood)
Melaleuca
(Paperbark)
Metrosideros excelsa
(New Zealand Christmas Tree)
Olea varieties
(Olive)
Parkinsonia
(Palo Verde)
Pistacia chinensis
(Chinese Pistache)
Prosopsis
(Chilean Mesquite)
Rhus lancea
(African Sumac)
Quercus agrifolia
(Coast Live Oak)


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In November

There is a lot to do in your landscape this month. It’s time to get out there to plan ahead for spring and prepare for winter storms. Soil temperatures are still warm and the digging is easy. Get out there and plant, plant, plant!

Color: Pansies planted now will provide beautiful color through the winter months. Columbine, Cyclamen, Poppies, Primrose, Ranunculus, Snapdragon, Stock and Viola will all add a nice splash of color to your garden.

Fruits & Vegetables: Plant containerized fruit trees and bushes now. Don’t plant bare root plants until next month. Fruit trees should be sprayed for pests in 6 week intervals when the trees are in their dormant stages. An easy way to remember the schedule is to spray around the following holidays; Thanksgiving (when the last leaf has fallen), New Years Day (the height of dormancy) and Valentine’s Day (when the buds begin to swell). Remember to follow the manufacturer’s directions for application carefully. Prune old canes of berries (except raspberries) back to the ground leaving the new canes to produce fruit next year. Plant vegetables like artichokes, beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, garlic, lettuce, onion, peas, radishes, spinach and turnips. Plant strawberries.

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