Quality never grew so good!
Share this Article:

In your Garden in September

Category: In Your Garden  |  Permalink

Published: Thursday, August 31, 2017

September is a great time of year in your landscape. The ornamental grasses that you've planted should be flowering right now and at their peak. With the days shortening, be careful not to water too late in the day to discourage diseases - and - with the drought in effect - don't forget the watering schedules your water district has enforced: http://www.sdcwa.org/find-your-water-district/. Fertilize your entire garden. At the minimum, an easy way to remember when to fertilize is to do it on the first day of the three growing seasons; the first day of spring, the first day of summer and the first day of fall. Mark your calendar for September 21st. A good all-purpose fertilizer can be used on most of your plants including fruit trees. Fertilize Azaleas, Camellias and Gardenias with a high acid fertilizer. Be sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions closely.

Color: Now is the time to plant Delphinium, Dianthus and Digitalis. Mums should be available also along with Iceland Poppies, Primula, Snapdragons and Stock. Marigolds and Petunias may be looking a little tired. Clip old blooms to stretch their time in the garden. Begin planting spring bulbs this month. Plant in masses in the ground or in pots to create a spectacular spring show. The iris in your garden can be cut back and divided now in preparation for next spring.

Fruits & Vegetables: In mild winter climates, plant your first crop of lettuce. Plant every few weeks to have a continual crop. Plant beets, broccoli, cabbage, onions, peas and spinach also. Don't plant during a heat wave.

Roses & Flowers: Keep deadheading all flowers to prolong the bloom period. Fertilize roses now to encourage blooms next month.

Do a test run on your irrigation system to ensure that all lines are clear and emitters are working efficiently. Make sure that you maintain the watering schedule for plants in pots that are not part of the irrigation system. Rinse off the foliage in your landscape to remove dust from plants which can be a habitat for mites and other insects.

If it freezes where you live, put a thick layer of mulch down to help protect the roots during the upcoming cooler temperatures.

In your vegetable or flower garden, add a layer of compost (2-3 inches for good soil, 4-6 inches for clay or sandy soil). Mixing this in now will put needed nutrients back into the soil and you'll reap the benefits in the crops you plant now and in the spring.

Share this Article:

In your Garden in July

Category: In Your Garden  |  Permalink

Published: Saturday, July 1, 2017

Your garden will respond this month to the long days of sunshine and warm weather.   The annuals you planted earlier in the year should be looking their best and the fruit trees should be loaded with fruit.  Some of the vegetables you've planted are being harvested and your garden overall should look spectacular.  Spend more time outside doing simple chores and enjoy what you've created.

Color: While many of your annuals are probably at their peak, it's not too late to add a few plants to your beds and pots.  Marigolds, Salvia, Zinnia, Verbena and many other varieties are available to plant in the sun.  As always, bedding Begonias and Impatiens are available for the shade along with Coleus and Kalanchoe.

Fruits & Vegetables: Plums and Peaches on your fruit trees should be ready to pick and enjoy.  Early crops such as beans and cucumbers may be ready to harvest this month.  Remove fruit and vegetables as they ripen.  Leaving them on the plant can encourage pests and diseases.  You can replant now for another vegetable crop later this year.  Prune spent canes off of fruiting vines.

Lawn: Raising the blade on your lawnmower and allowing the blades to grow to 2-2 ½" will help keep the ground moisture in your lawn. In consideration of the drought, be sure to establish a twice weekly watering schedule.

Roses & Flowers: Deadhead roses and feed after the bloom cycle.  Keep deadheading all flowers to prolong the bloom period.

Mulch flower beds and around shrubs and trees to help retain soil moisture through these typically hottest months.

Like every month, do a test run on your irrigation system to ensure that all lines are clear and emitters are working efficiently. Make sure that you establish a watering schedule for plants in pots that are not part of the irrigation system and again - be sure to establish a watering schedule in compliance with the drought mandates (all are two days a week - but check this link to find your local water agency's rules: http://www.sdcwa.org/find-your-water-district

Share this Article:

In your Garden in June

Category: In Your Garden  |  Permalink

Published: Monday, June 5, 2017

Viewing your landscape this month you have a real feeling of satisfaction. The flowers are in full bloom, vegetables and fruit trees are both producing and the weather has warmed up just enough to be enjoyable. Spend time in your yard. Relax and enjoy the fruits of your labors.

Color: For a quick-fix to your garden, add fast growing annuals like Petunias, Vinca, Marigolds and Zinnia. There is a plethora of color available right now to add interest to your flower beds and borders. Experiment and try something different. New varieties of Alyssum, Celosia, Coreopsis, Foxglove and Gazania are all great summer color. Plant those now. Also try Dianthus, Hollyhocks and Penstemon. For color in the shade, besides Impatiens and Begonias, try Coleus, Kalanchoe and Heuchera. Continue to pinch back faded blossoms.

Fruits & Vegetables: Summer vegetables such as squash, beans and tomatoes that are planted much after the first of the month, won't be in the ground long enough to give you a significant crop. Get them in right away. There's still time to plant beets, beans, melons, radishes, squash and heat tolerant lettuces. Plant the last patch of corn this month. Keep fruit and vegetables picked. Remove any fallen produce that may attract unwanted pests or encourage diseases that may spread to other parts of your landscape. Be sure to keep herbs pinched back.

Lawn: Keep in mind the water restrictions recently enforced - to irrigate ornamental landscapes no more than two days a week across the region - See more at: http://www.sdcwa.org/state-water-use-reduction-mandates-start-today for more details and your water agency's specific watering schedule. Lightly fertilize and be sure to mow on a weekly basis. If you haven't raised the blade on your lawn mower, raise it now to about 2 - 2 ½". It's also a good time to have the blade re-sharpened.

Roses & Flowers: Please see our blog - "How to take care of your roses when in a drought" for this month's advice on roses.

Irrigation: Again, keep in mind the water restrictions enforced state-wide on June 1st. Rebates are available for switching out your irrigation products. One to take advantage of is for installing rotor type sprinklers (MP Rotators) instead of fixed spray sprinklers. These rotating sprinklers reduce runoff and put out about 1/3 the water of a regular spray head. Check the Be Water Wise website for rebates - www.bewaterwise.com. Rebates are also available for various water efficient irrigation tools such as weather based irrigation controllers and soil moisture sensors. Check the SoCal Water Smart website for details - www.socalwatersmart.com

Share this Article:

In your Garden in May

Category: In Your Garden  |  Permalink

Published: Tuesday, May 2, 2017

May's weather is often unpredictable. It can bring an occasional shower, fog and extreme heat along with what is commonly known as 'May Gray', overcast skies. May is also one of the busiest and most satisfying months in the garden. There is still planting to be done, some pruning, continual deadheading, mowing, weeding, mulching and much more. At the end of the day when you look back at all you've accomplished, you're pleased with your efforts and satisfied with a job well done.

Color: As a guideline, most annuals and perennials take 6-8 weeks to mature from a 4" pot. Use this timeline when planning color planting for special events you're hosting such as graduations, weddings, and family gatherings. Plant far enough ahead so that the plants are looking their best. Feed hanging baskets and plants in pots every 3 weeks to keep them looking lush. Now is the time to plant heat loving flowers such as ageratum, asters, celosia, chrysanthemum, coleus, bedding begonias, gazania, impatiens, lobelia, marigolds, nicotiana, petunias, Shasta daisies, verbena and zinnias among many more. Try something new this season and spice up your garden. Pinch back stems to encourage full plants that will produce lots of flowers.

Fruits & Vegetables: Since the weather has warmed up, it the perfect time to plant exotic fruit trees like bananas, avocados, citrus and mangos. Keep well mulched to retain moisture. Plant beans, beets, carrots, celery, eggplant, melons and tomatoes. Pesky caterpillars are starting to appear. Treat them with a nontoxic insecticide to keep them under control. When trying to locate the elusive tomato hornworm, sprinkle the plant with water and watch for movement as they shake the water off of themselves.

Lawn: Mow at least once a week to maintain a healthy lawn. If you lowered the blade on your lawnmower in the fall raise it back up now so that the fresh cut lawn is 2" to 2 ½" tall. This will help retain moisture in the soil when the days get hotter. Fertilize on a regular basis to stimulate a lush lawn. Weeds that appear in a lawn can be a sign of stress. Adjusting the Ph closer to 7 will help the grass overtake the weeds. Consider renting an aerator. An aerator makes holes in the surface of the law so that water can easily penetrate to the roots.

Roses & Flowers: This is your last chance to plant late blooming plants such as dahlia, gladiolus and tuberoses. To keep roses in full bloom, feed and water regularly and dead head any spent blooms. Watch for mildew and treat as soon as detected to keep it under control. For fragrance, also plant gardenias, jasmine and pittosporum. Remove spent flowers from spring bulbs but leave the foliage. Feed now for strong growth and flower production in the spring.

Irrigation: Test your sprinklers to make sure all heads and emitters are working properly. Adjust your sprinklers for longer days and the time change. Keep young plants adequately watered to help them establish in the garden. As always, avoid overhead irrigation late in the day.

Also:

Mulch, mulch, mulch-- Mulching keeps the weeds down and water in while looking esthetically pleasing.

Thin fruit off of fruit trees to promote healthy growth. Branches weighed down by heavy fruit can break and distort the shape of the tree. Twist off excess fruit so the remaining fruit is spaced every 4-6 inches on alternate sides of the branch. Suckers on your fruit trees are taking nutrients away from fruit production. Remove them to encourage stronger, larger and tastier fruit. Feed and water fruit trees regularly to keep nutrient levels up. Leaves damaged from leaf curl or other diseases should be removed and disposed of. Do not mulch or compost as this will spread the disease.

Along with everything else, the weeds are growing substantially this month also. Keep on top of weeding so that seeds don't spread around the garden. Weeding the day after watering makes the task much simpler.

Lightly prune winter and spring flowering trees and shrubs after the blooms have expired. Heavy pruning should be done later in the year when the heat has passed but before flower buds have set.

Share this Article:

In your Garden in April

Category: In Your Garden  |  Permalink

Published: Friday, April 7, 2017

April in Southern California is perfect for playing in your garden. The days are longer and warmer and there's always something to do. Plant every chance you get. Local garden centers are loaded with all that new and interesting this month. Drop by discover something exciting.

Work with what you've got. If you would like to grow herbs and vegetables but don't have a large space consider establishing a container garden. A variety of inexpensive pots in various shapes and sizes can be used to cultivate a ‘patio garden'. In pots or in the ground, group tomatoes, onions, peppers and cilantro together and you have a ‘salsa garden'. Be creative in the space you're allowed.

Color: Asters, Coleus and Zinnias are showing up in the garden centers now. April is one of the months with the largest selection of flowering plants available. Be creative and make your own hanging baskets and potted patio plants using some of your favorites. Continue to dead head all flowering plants for optimum flower production.

Fruits & Vegetables: Plant Citrus, Bananas, Avocados, Guava and other frost sensitive fruit trees this month. Fertilize existing fruit trees to help promote good fruit production. Additionally, thin excess fruit from young trees before the fruit reaches the size of an almond. This will prevent undue stress being put on the tree. Peaches should be thinned to every 5" on alternate sides of the branch with plums, nectarines and apricots spaced at every 3". Time to put in vegetables such as beans, corn, peppers, cucumbers and tomatoes if you haven't done so. Also plant melons, squash and gourds.

Lawn:If you have a problem with crabgrass, apply a pre-emergent herbicide before it gets out of control. Mow your lawn frequently - every week. To keep a healthy lawn, never cut more than 1/3 of the length of the blade of grass. Fertilize regularly. Your lawn needs between 3-5 inches of water in April. Make sure it gets about 1/2" twice a week. (In most sprinkler systems, it takes about 20 minutes to get 1/2" of water.)

Perennials: It's not too late to divide perennials such as Agapanthus, Moraea and Hemerocallis. Make sure they're planted immediately after division. Divide and transplant grasses too. For bushier flowering shrubs, pinch new growth to encourage fullness at the base of the plant.

Pests: Treat aphids, spider mites and white fly with insecticidal soap or a brisk spray of water.

Roses & Flowers: Roses should be at their peak right now. Continue to dead head and feed with a high nitrogen fertilizer.

Irrigation: Keeping an eye on the weather, set your irrigation for the longer, warmer days. Check your system to make sure that everything is working efficiently. A deep, thorough watering is better than a short, shallow watering. Deep watering encourages roots to go deep which will benefit the plant later this summer.

Also: Once the weather has warmed and the plants in your garden are beginning to show signs of life, prune off any cold damage that may have been inflicted during the winter. Cut just below where the dead branches begin. If you're not sure about what is damaged or not, wait until next month and reassess the damage.

Stake taller growing plants now while they're smaller and easier to manage.

Sheer formal hedges and prune evergreens in preparation of their spring growth spurts.

Prune and fertilize groundcovers to remove dead patches and encourage new growth.

Other Recent Articles

In your Garden in February

Category: In Your Garden  |  Permalink

Published: Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Cool weather vegetables like lettuce, carrots, broccoli, celery, white potatoes, peas and radishes can be planted now

Read more Read More

In your Garden in January

Category: In Your Garden  |  Permalink

Published: Sunday, January 1, 2017

Read more Read More

In your Garden in December

Category: In Your Garden  |  Permalink

Published: Thursday, December 1, 2016

There's not a lot going on in the garden this month which is good because chances are your time is full of other commitments.

Read more Read More

In your Garden in November

Category: In Your Garden  |  Permalink

Published: Tuesday, November 1, 2016

There is a lot to do in your landscape this month. We normally get about 10% of our annual rainfall in November.

Read more Read More

Subscribe to our RSS Blog with one of these popular web-based RSS feed readers:
  • Subscribe to our RSS Blog with Google RSS Feed Reader
  • Subscribe to our RSS Blog with Yahoo! RSS Feed Reader
  • Subscribe to our RSS Blog with AOL RSS Feed Reader
  • Subscribe to our RSS Blog with NewsGator RSS Feed Reader
  • Subscribe to our RSS Blog with NetVibes RSS Feed Reader
  • Subscribe to our RSS Blog with Rojo RSS Feed Reader
  • Subscribe to our RSS Blog with Pageflakes RSS Feed Reader
  • Subscribe to our RSS Blog with Blog Lines RSS Feed Reader
Or...subscribe with your stand-alone RSS feed reader; copy & paste the following RSS feed URL into your reader:

Blog Roll & Resources

© Copyright 2017, Briggs Tree Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact Us at 1-760-727-2727
Privacy Policy
Infinity Arts: Custom Website Design & CMS Web Hosting.