In Your Garden in January

Posted on January 22, 2018 in Uncategorized

In January, your landscape is at its most dormant stage and there’s very little to do.  Aside from pruning and transplanting there’s not a lot going on.  With high moisture levels in the ground, be careful not to disturb the soil too much.   Overworking can result in compaction that may harm the soil structure.   Do go to your local nursery or garden center.  Azaleas, Camellias are blooming along with New Zealand Tea Trees (Leptospermum scoparium) and other plants.  Putting these in your garden will ensure that you have flowers in your garden when most flowering plants are in their dormant stage.

Color:   Fill in bare spots with cool weather annuals.  Pansies, Snapdragons, Iceland poppies and Kale are great additions to the garden along with Cyclamen, Primula and Begonias.  Keep leaf trash cleaned from the base of the plants.  Plant summer blooming bulbs; canna, dahlia, lilies, tuberose and tuberous begonias.

Fruits & Vegetables:  Plant bare-root fruit trees, grapes, berries and strawberries now.  Soak roots in water overnight before planting.  Continue to spray dormant fruit trees for pests, include trunk and soil around the base of the tree.  Prune established fruit trees to maintain a uniform shape.  Many cool weather vegetables are available.  Sow beet, carrot and radish seeds.

Lawn:  Mow cool weather lawns weekly.  Appling a pre-emergent weed killer now will save you time and money later in the year.  Give your lawnmower a tune up.  Change the oil and have the blade to your lawnmower sharpened or do it yourself.

Roses & Flowers:  Clean leaf litter from around the base of plants to discourage snails & slugs.  Bait as necessary.  Prune roses before new growth begins.  Water roses thoroughly before pruning.  Other flowering shrubs should be pruned after the first bloom cycle.

Irrigation:  Do a test run on your irrigation system to ensure that all lines are clear and emitters are working efficiently.  Watch your system carefully.  If it rains, turn the system off and save the water.

Also:  Natives can also be pruned lightly now in order to maintain a uniform shape.  If rainfall isn’t heavy, water deeply.  The moisture they store now will help them through the hot summer months.

Bulbs with higher cold requirements need to be planted in cold soil.  If the weather is cool, between Christmas and New Years, plant then.  Otherwise wait until the soil temperature drops being sure to plant before January 10th.

Protect tender plants from frost by covering them with a non-plastic material when frost threatens.  Keeping plantings well hydrated will help frost survival also.  A turgid plant will recover from frost better than a dry plant.  Should a frost damage your garden, don’t be tempted to prune off the damaged parts.  They’ll help protect the plant from further damage should another frost occur.  Trim these parts off later in the year when all risk of frost has past.

Plant and transplant Azaleas and Camellias.  Be sure to use a high acid planting mix to promote growth.

Cool temperature weather is the perfect time to prune evergreens

Posted on January 22, 2018 in Uncategorized